Comprehensive Addiction Resources Emergency Act of 2019 (HR 2569, 116th Congress)

Policy Details

Policy Details

Originating Entity
Last Action
Referred to Subcommittee
Date of Last Action
May 31 2019
Congressional Session
116th Congress
Date Introduced
May 8 2019
Publication Date
May 16 2019

SciPol Summary

The Comprehensive Addiction Resources Emergency Act of 2019 (HR 2569 / S 1365, 116th Congress) would authorize $100 billion in appropriations across ten fiscal years to a variety of programs aimed at curbing the ongoing opioid epidemic. Specifically, the Act would authorization appropriation of the following:

  • $2.7 billion, annually for ten fiscal years, for the Local Substance Use and Opioid Emergency Relief Grant Program;
  • $4 billion, annually for ten fiscal years, for the State and Tribal Substance Use Disorder Prevention Intervention Grant Program;
  • $500 million, annually for ten fiscal years, for other grant programs aimed at “funding prevention services, core medical services, recovery and support services, early intervention services, harm reduction services, and administrative expenses”;
  • $500 million, annually for ten fiscal years, for grant programs “to administer special projects of national significance to support the development of innovative and original models for the delivery of substance use disorder treatment services”;
  • $500 million, annually for ten fiscal years, for grant programs to educate healthcare providers and faculty members, and develop educational materials around opioid use disorder best practices;
  • $50 million, annually for ten fiscal years, for grant programs to bolster the capacity of healthcare providers to adequately treat substance use disorder;
  • $40 million, annually for ten fiscal years, for programs to assist workers who either have or are at risk of developing substance use disorder;
  • $10 million, annually for ten fiscal years, to understand how workers with substance use disorder affect the workplace;
  • $500 million, annually for ten fiscal years, for a naloxone distribution program;
  • $700 million, annually for ten fiscal years, for the National Institutes of Health to invest in research on addiction and pain; and
  • $500 million, annually for ten fiscal years, for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help states participate in the Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance program and bolster their capacity to monitor data involving drug overdoses.
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